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After Hours Emergencies: 256-506-1683 Schedule Appt. Call 256-279-8500

After Hours Emergencies: 256-506-1683 Schedule Appt. Call 256-279-8500

Low Vision in Alabama

Some people are born with various visual disabilities and others acquire them in life due to various diseases that may not be treatable.

At Clinic for Vision PC in Albertville, we offer many devices from one of the most advanced low vision providers in the eyecare world today, eschenbach. From reading glasses and spectacle magnifiers, to hand-held, video and lamp magnifiers and telescopes, we are able to offer our patients incredible devices to help them maintain their independence despite the difficulties associated with their low vision". Learn about advanced progressive lenses.

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Low Vision Info

Low vision is the term used to describe reduced eyesight – either blurred vision (usually 20/70 or worse) or an incomplete field of view – that cannot be fully corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses or eye surgery. The primary causes of low vision in Albertville are eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. But low vision also can be inherited or caused by an eye or brain injury.

A person with low vision is not blind: they have some useful sight. But the degree of their visual impairment can make daily tasks, such as reading and driving, difficult or impossible.

Who can have low vision?

Though children as well as adults can be visually impaired, low vision is mostly a problem that afflicts seniors. Vision loss after a lifetime of good eyesight can be very traumatic, leading to frustration and depression.

Many people who develop eye problems that cause low vision lose their jobs. According to Lighthouse International, among visually impaired Americans of ages 21 to 64, only 43.7% are employed. Among normally-sighted people in this age group, 80% are employed.

Not being able to drive safely, read quickly, or easily see images on a television or computer screen can cause people with low vision to feel shut off from the world. They may be unable to get around town independently, earn a living or even shop for food and other necessities. Some visually impaired people become completely dependent on friends and relatives, while others suffer alone.

Solutions

Thankfully, in many cases, people with impaired vision can be helped by low vision devices, which include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, handheld magnifiers and telescopes, and stand-alone magnifiers. There are many ingenious low vision devices and strategies that can help visually-impaired individuals get the most out of their remaining sight and, in many cases, continue to live independently.

If you have hazy or blurred vision, light sensitivity, loss of peripheral vision, night blindness, a need for more light than before, unusual floaters or spots, or difficulty reading – your first step is to see your Albertville, AL eyecare professional for a complete exam.

These could be the first signs of a serious eye disease such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, or retinitis pigmentosa. Or, they could mean you are developing a cataract that needs removal. Whatever the case, it’s wise to take action before further vision loss occurs.

What are some options for patients with low vision?

Since low vision cannot be fully corrected, a person with low vision must learn ways to continue to function independently with the sight still available to them. Dr. Nichols comments, “Those with low vision often become dependent on friends and family to perform daily tasks, which sometimes results in feelings of embarrassment and shame due to their increased inability to do things for themselves. It is important to know that even if you suffer from low vision, there are options for you to regain and maintain your independence.”

After Hours Emergencies: 256-506-1683 Schedule Appt. Call 256-279-8500

After Hours Emergencies: 256-506-1683 Schedule Appt. Call 256-279-8500

How to Cope with Low Vision

What causes low vision

Reduced vision is defined as vision that can not be corrected completely using either contact lenses, eyeglasses, or surgery, and is blurry (at the level of at least 20/70), or limited in its view field. Low vision is sometimes caused by injury to the eye or brain, and it can be inherited. However, the main cause of low vision is eye disease, including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and macular degeneration.

Who is affected by low vision

Low vision is a condition that the elderly suffer from, although it is possible for children and adults to have low vision. After a life of seeing normally, losing your vision can be hard, or even traumatic, and can potentially lead to frustration, or even depression.

Struggles of people with low vision

What is especially hard about low vision is that many people are unable to work, and lose their existing jobs. In 2010 the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey showed that the employment rate for Americans with low vision was 24 percent.

If you have low vision, you probably feel disconnected from the rest of the world. With low vision, it’s hard to read, see images on television or a computer screen, and impossible to drive. You may not be able to be independent and run your own errands, shop for food, or visit friends and family. Sometimes people with a vision impairment suffer with this burden alone, while others must rely completely on friends and relatives on a daily basis.

Low vision aids

There are many devices and ways to manage low vision, which can help people suffering with low vision to continue leading productive and independent lives. Some of the devices that can help make the most out of remaining vision are magnifiers, both handheld and mounted on eyeglasses, and telescopes.

Low vision symptoms

Signs that it is time to see an eye doctor include loss of peripheral vision, blurry vision, sensitivity to light, night blindness, needing more light to see, spots or floaters, and reading difficulty. These symptoms could indicate that a cataract is beginning in your eye. Or these problems could be signs of an eye condition such as glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa, or macular degeneration. Make sure to see your eye doctor before any eye condition becomes so serious that vision loss occurs.

What is a low vision specialist

If it’s not possible to correct your vision loss with surgery, medical treatment, or eyewear, your eye doctor will send you to a specialist in low vision care. A low vision specialist, who is usually an optometrist, will evaluate your vision loss. Once he or she determines the type and degree of vision loss you are suffering from, this specialist can create a treatment plan including low vision aids, and guidance in using devices that help you to live with vision loss.

Additionally, a low vision specialist has knowledge of many different types of aids for low vision, including large-print and audio books, specially-designed lights, and signature guides that are used to sign checks and other documents. Sometimes eye care professionals that are treating vision loss recommend counseling to help their patients learn to live with the changes that low vision brings.

Low Vision Aids for Computer Users

In general, visually-impaired people can use the same low vision aids for viewing a computer screen and reading e-mail as they do for other reading activities.

In addition, special software has been developed to increase the size of print and images on computer screens and convert printed information into audible messages that are “read” by a synthetic voice.

These innovative low vision devices let partially-sighted people do the same computer-related tasks as fully-sighted people – such as word-processing, creating and using spreadsheets and viewing Web pages online.

Increasing Print and Image Sizes

Most computer operating systems and Internet browsers allow you to increase the size of Web pages and text on your computer screen to make them more visible to partially-sighted users.

Here are a few simple tips for adjusting text size:

  • In browsers such as Microsoft's Internet Explorer, Mozilla's Firefox and Apple's Safari, you can enlarge text on your screen by holding down the Control ("Ctrl") key on your keyboard and tapping the "+" key.
  • To return the text to its normal size, tap the "-" key while holding down the Control key.
  • You also can hold down the Control or Command key, and then use the wheel on your mouse (see below) to increase or decrease the text size on your screen.
  • Still another way to enlarge text on your screen is to use the "Text Size" or "Make Text Larger" command within "View" in the drop-down menu bar that appears at the top of your screen, but only when you use popular software programs such as Microsoft Word and Outlook.

Large-print display software goes the extra step and displays not just larger text, but also icons, mouse pointers and other navigation items at larger sizes.

For better visibility, it's also a good idea to purchase a large LCD display for your desktop computer - a screen that measures at least 20 inches diagonally can be a big help. Another option is to use a screen magnifier placed in front of your display.

Talking Computers

People with tunnel vision from glaucoma or central blind spots from macular degeneration may find it difficult and tiring to read an entire computer screen. This is one reason that "talking computers" were invented.

Talking computers are based on optical character recognition (OCR) systems that first scan text in a word processing document or Web page, and then convert the text to sounds. The result is a synthetic voice that reads aloud not only the actual text but also important navigation items such as the cursor location. Voice systems are available from several major software companies.

Your Mouse

Some people with low vision, especially if they are good typists, like to use keyboard commands instead of a mouse, because it can be easier to type a keyboard command than to move the cursor to a precise place on the screen with a mouse.

If you would rather use a mouse, choose one that is ergonomically designed for comfort and ease of use. One great innovation is a wheel that is mounted in the center of the mouse and lets you scroll up and down the screen just by moving the wheel with your finger.

A wireless optical mouse is another good option because your movements aren't limited by the wire leading from the mouse to the computer. If you sometimes experience hand cramps, try using a bigger mouse that lets your hand stay in a more open position, instead of clenched up.

A common source of frustration is a mouse set at a speed that is too fast or too slow. If you're a Windows user and you can't control your mouse because it seems to "zoom" across the screen, you can adjust this by clicking on the Start menu, then Control Panel, then Mouse. There you'll find all kinds of mouse behavior settings, including the pointer speed.

Eliminate Display Flicker Enhance Contrast

If images on your computer monitor seem to flicker, you can usually eliminate this by adjusting the screen refresh rate, which is how often your monitor redraws the content on the screen. If you use Windows, go to the Start menu, then Control Panel, then Display, then Advanced, then Monitor. Set the refresh rate to 70 Hz (hertz) or higher.

You can eliminate flicker problems altogether by purchasing a liquid crystal display (LCD), which doesn't require images to be "refreshed" like a traditional cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor. For this reason, LCD screens typically cause less eyestrain. For the best screen visibility for someone with low vision, choose an LCD display with a high contrast ratio. Salespeople at your local computer store can help you identify these models.

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Meet Our Eye Doctor

dr.-nichols
Dr. Nichols is a native of Birmingham and attended  Florida College, The University of South Florida, and The University of Alabama Birmingham School of Optometry.  Graduating in 1981, Doctor Nichols and his family moved to Albertville and assumed the practice of retiring Doctor J.F. McLendon. In 2011, Dr. Nichols was...

After Hours Emergencies: 256-506-1683 Schedule Appt. Call 256-279-8500

After Hours Emergencies: 256-506-1683 Schedule Appt. Call 256-279-8500